Wyoming Whisky.











Photographs © Jeremy Wade Shockley 2009.

This essay began in 2006 when I was working on a ranch piece for Rich Clarkson’s photojournalism workshop, Photography at the Summit. Growing up around Colorado ranch lands, I held a strong connection with my subject and a friendship quickly developed with the Mead Family in Jackson, Wyoming.

I was asked to return to Wyoming two years later in order to collaborate on a photography project for the Mead’s latest business venture, Wyoming Whisky. Having acquired ranch lands in the small community of Kirby, Wyoming, the Meads set out to create America’s next great bourbon.

This small batch bourbon whisky will be produced under the supervision of Master Distiller Steve Nally. Whisky production officially began at high noon on July, 4th, 2009.

Wyoming Whisky has had great support from the community and is bolstering the local economy by creating jobs and raising the demand for regional grains. Please visit their website for more details!

Click HERE to visit the Wyoming Whisky website.

A slideshow of the full photo essay is available at my PhotoShelter Archive, Click HERE.

This photographic essay was produced during a single day of cattle branding on the Mead Ranch in Kirby, Wyoming.

Canyon of the Ancients.






Photographs © Jeremy Wade Shockley 2009. All Rights Reserved.

Accessible only by boat, Defiance House is located in the Canyon of the Ancients, one of the many fingers of Lake Powell. The controversial reservoir, flooded many of the canyons and archaeological sites in and around Glen Canyon, Utah.

I had an opportunity to return to this Native American Cultural Site on a recent trip to Lake Powell, where I went to celebrate a close friend’s birthday and breath in the desert air. While the cliche image of Lake Powell involves board shorts and spring breakers, I have always made exploring the surrounding desert and endless canyons a priority.

Although a cool swim and a cold beer never hurt, Thanks for all the trips Nathan!

Photo Credit: Rachel Beckelhymer

The photographer’s work is done…

Solix Biofuels.

Photograph Jeremy Wade Shockley/SU DRUM

Solix Biofuels, whose motto is Fueling a Better World, is a Colorado State University startup company based out of Fort Collins, Colorado. Focusing on alternative energy production technology, Solix is making possible the large-scale commercialization of microalgae-based fuels and co-products. The Coyote Gulch Biofuels Plant is the first major step in creating a facility for full-scale production and has been achieved through Solix’s partnership with Southern Ute Alternative Energy.

Please visit the Southern Ute Drum Newspaper online to see the full story and photographs!

Cheers, Jeremy

Chimney Rock Cultural Gathering.

Photograph Jeremy Wade Shockley/SU DRUM

15th Annual Chimney Rock Native American Cultural Gathering
Text and Photographs: Jeremy Wade Shockley
Southern Ute Drum Vol.XLI No.15

Dark thunderclouds moved in from the northwest as dancers from Denver began to don their regalia in preparation for dance. A strong breeze ruffled the feathers of the elaborate headdresses, which had been moved under the porch awning and out of the weather. The leader and teacher of this dance group watched the sky, his name is Carlos Castaneda. Carlos is the head dancer for the Aztec Mexica Dancers, pronounced me-she-ka. These dancers have made the journey from Denver to Chimney Rock Archaeological Area for the last twelve years.

Their traditional dance is part of the annual Chimney Rock Native American Cultural Gathering, now in it’s 15th year. Carlos feels the practice of traditional dance builds and maintains a strong connection with his past, an ancestry going back to the traditional cultures of Mexico and Central America. “ My parents and grandparents did not pass this down, these dances were forbidden to them, we are reclaiming our culture through ceremonies that were almost lost,” said Carlos. We spoke of the weather, as Carlos finished lacing up his regalia, “It will rain, you’ll see.”

The Aztec dance group consisted of men and women, two drummers and few young children dressed in full regalia. The ceremony began with an offering of incense and prayer to the four directions. The fervent dancing began almost immediately to the sound of fast paced, rhythmic drumming. Each dancer taking the lead in turn, as large drops of rain began to fall. Carlos beckoned the spectators to join them in the arena for the final dance as the heavens rained down. The heavy downpour did not dampen spirits as the dance continued in a fast circular fashion, perhaps drawing an unexpected energy from the sudden shift in weather, embracing the warm summer rains.


Chimney Rock Archaeological Area is located just west of Pagosa Springs and the Southern Ute recreation area known as Lake Capote. Following the rainstorm, a second dance arena had been designated along the ridge line, where the dark clouds made way for clear skies and sunshine. Performing traditional dances, there were a number of Hopi dance groups as well as singers and dancers from Acoma Pueblo. The arena was set in a traditional kiva, allowing these dances a more traditional setting. A Hopi Dance group held the first dance from Second Mesa, performing the “Buffalo Dance”. This group’s village of origin is Sipaulovi, meaning “Village of Mosquitoes.”

“The Acoma Pueblo dancers return to the cultural gathering annually” said Albert Alno of the Acoma Pueblo Traditional Dancers and Singers. Proud of his young dancers, Albert spoke favorably of the setting and environment that the Cultural gathering had to offer. Aside from a historical and picturesque dance arena, concessions were also provided. Various artisans also traveled to this event, setting up ceramics and jewelery under the shelter of tarps.

Tewa Dancers from the North also performed in the Kiva, with group leader Andrew Garcia drumming with relatives. Andrew hails from Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo and has been involved with positive mentoring since 1974. His program started as a means to keep youth off of drugs and alcohol, to teach them the values of traditional life ways throughout Native American culture. His dance group has since traveled the world and continues to bring a positive impact to the youth involved. His “Eagle Dancers” performed beautifully.

With the last rays of golden sunlight splashing the earthen floor, two dancers entered the Kiva. Moving to the drums, Philbert Polingyouma and his partner danced gracefully as the light began to fade into evening. This dance concluded the 15th annual Chimney rock Native American Cultural Gathering, a two-day event held in the mountains of Colorado, come rain or shine. Photographs Jeremy Wade Shockley/SU DRUM

Visit the SOUTHERN UTE DRUM website to see the full article and photographs.

Cheers, Jeremy

Angelina Rubio




Photographs © Jeremy Wade Shockley 2009. All Rights Reserved.

Angelina Rubio revisits Cuba through David Alan Harvey’s photographs. Having spent time in Cuba herself, the images of Cuban culture evoke emotion and happiness. Stories of day to day Cuban life are shared amongst family and friends during her graduation party.

Nina and her tia page through Harvey’s book following a traditional home cooked meal of Carne Asada and Civiche. Angelina works in the field of medicine; she is a kind, talented and generous individual!

I chose these images for their quite, personal feel, I hope you enjoy them!

Cheers, Jeremy

Photograph © Jeremy Wade Shockley. All Rights Reserved.