Garrett & Claire.

Photograph © Jeremy Wade Shockley 2010.

This image was taken a few years ago. My cousin Garrett Ross and his girlfriend Claire paid us a visit at the Lake House in Colorado. The lake was frozen, and the sky was blue. Good for photos, great for memories.

Here’s to you Garrett!

Best, Jeremy

Timeless.

Photograph © Jeremy Wade Shockley 2010.

I took this photo of my close friend, Booms, on a return trip to the Mountain Kingdom in 2007. Booms is a kind, generous and loyal individual. He first came to me seeking help with some reading assignments for school, after some time we would pass the evenings together pitching horseshoes outside of my small hut in the village of Ha Mohatlane, sharing quarts of pilsner and a few stories. Booms is the silent type.

Near the end of my two years in Lesotho, Booms took as much interest in my photography it seemed, as I did, and became the closest thing to a fixer as I have known. We would spend hours during the weekend, visiting distant friends and relatives of his in neighboring communities, seeking subject material to put in front of my lens. Inevitably- my spoken Sosotho would reach apparent limitations-Booms was also my interpreter. During the week, he would often stop in to relax, particularly when any of my American Expatriates happened into town for a few days. Booms and I were friends.

This photo is a record of an afternoon spent at the home of Eddy Lesenyehoe, cold beers in the African heat, the sound of children and stories. I was content to be home, content to be back on African soil. A moment that no longer exists outside of this image.

Isis.

Photograph © Jeremy Wade Shockley 2010.

Isis – loving and equally rambunctious. A gift to Rachel when this pint sized kitten was just a handful of wildcat. A New Mexico stray with a deep thread of loyalty. Named after a song on Bob Dylan’s Desire – Isis has quadrupled in size some where between the weeks of stacking firewood and shoveling snow here in the mountains of Colorado.

I now sit comfortably in my home office, a full day ahead of me. Snow falling heavily. Opportunity to rest, opportunity to achieve. Some tasks cannot wait. The professional life of a photographer has layers of responsibility. While some projects have deadlines, others are never finished.

Cheers, Jeremy

Rainy Days.



Photographs © Jeremy Wade Shockley 2010.

In travels, I would say that one can almost count on rain. Be it a steady drizzle or turbulent downpour -Streets, cafes, and cantinas are an ideal place to shoot. Find some shelter, buy a beer and set up for a good shot. The results will prove more interesting than your average sunny day! Enjoy the weather.

Cheers, Jeremy

Photograph © Jeremy Wade Shockley 2010.

Subtle Elements.

Photo Jeremy Wade Shockley/SU DRUM

I posted two very similar images which I shot a few days ago. In this I thought it would be a great time to open up the conversation on editing. Most often we take a series of images where each photograph tells its own story, especially early on. I think that as one develops their own style, they become aware of elements and composition on a level that goes beyond the average photograph. As a photographer, I find myself lining up the elements, and often the layers, shooting similar pictures in an effort to bring the concert together, or simply all the elements. They must work together visually, while also adding interest to the situation, and if done right the photograph will also capture the moment as the artist/photographer intended it to be.

This is certainly not the most complex photo, but simple and beautiful for its own reasons. Each of the two images speaks differently against an almost unchanging background- which is the point of this post. While I love the lighting and emotion of the painters profile, there is also some attraction to the brush working canvas in the second shot-no personification needed.

Photo Jeremy Wade Shockley/SU DRUM

As photographers and journalist, we will always be editing our own work, even before we click the shutter. Most often we will be editing a number of similar images post capture, making decisions that will be final. It is in my opinion the pictures that are closest to each other, that will present the hardest edit. Photographs that are arguably beautiful, and even timeless, but subtly different. You of course must make the decision. One will be published, while the others fade into the archive, perhaps resurfacing in years to come.

Please lend your opinion here, is one of these two images clearly more meaningful, or attractive than the other? If so why?

Best, Jeremy

Making Friends.


Travel photography is about relationships. Much of photography is. This of course is my opinon-others will certainly differ. The cliche travel photograph seems to be fraught with motion blur, as figures weave in and out of picturesque landscapes and popular restaurants. While the timeless images of our century are intimate portraits of people, their culture. The landscape is merely an environment, and the emotion of your subject will go well beyond the exotic nature of place.


I only say this in an effort to open conversation. Conversation perhaps being the most important tool you can equip yourself with as you travel foreign lands, and distant places with camera in hand. If you are open to the people and accepting of the culture, all doors will open eventually. This sort of intimacy is what separates the true traveller, and the most experienced photojournalist from the rest of the camera wilding tourist who most likely pack the very same guidebooks as you. Take your time, open yourself up, and explore. Making friends is the key to great travel images, and certainly the thing that will bring you back to same community for years to come.

Enjoy your travels-both near and abroad! Cheers, Jeremy

Photographs © Jeremy Wade Shockley 2010.