Stripping Away the Darkness…

Photograph © Jeremy Wade Shockley 2011.

High ISO settings in todays digital cameras not only bring back unseen light, but have the ability to create an artistic approach unlike any thing else I have ever used. Long exposures on a tripod could create such effects if your subject was unmoving, here I was able to walk the beach, in nearly complete darkness, and still frame up a few images using the lights of the skyline to set my manual focus…experiment, push the limits and you might surprise yourself!

Snowdown: Voyeurism vs Interaction…




Photograph © Jeremy Wade Shockley 2011.

There are post that are timely and those that are not. Simple fact of life. Photography. I want to open a discussion that is valuable to everyone. The idea of a moment; moments witness and those we create. No matter the venue, no matter the culture, we perceive, create and effect.
As photographers, photojournalist; we will ultimately represent the scene. No matter how much we choose to involve ourselves-we play witness.


A shutter captures the moment, our presence interprets history.
Period.
I chose these images because they reflect both sides of an intricate and interesting small town tradition.
Snowdown.
Durango is filled with characters of all background, but perhaps their is no match to that which the residents exude every winter in during the annual Snowdown celebrations in the heart of this historic mountain town…

Photograph © Jeremy Wade Shockley 2011.

Define Purpose…

Photograph Jeremy Wade Shockley 2011.

I often ask myself…How do I do this? I find myself seeking what is sought. I often work for another.

How to approach a subject, how to appease an editor, a publisher?

Define success.

Tonight I shoot for myself. Tonight I define art. These are my moments!

Experience Photography.

Take Flight.

Photograph Jeremy Wade Shockley 2011.

Nightscape.



Photographs © Jeremy Wade Shockley 2010.

Spending a few nights in Denver afforded me the opportunity for some street photography along the 16Th Street Mall and Lodo District.

Living in rural Colorado, I find myself immediately attracted to the cityscape and all the elements that visually define an urban area: rich colors, neon lights, elegant buildings, and yes even the emptiness of great paved spaces and dark alleys. The bars and restaurants draw me in and eventually my senses calm down and as I return to the street, my lens comes back around to focus on the people of this urban landscape and the lives that they live…so different from my own.

I shot these images on my first night out, somewhere between a warm craft of Saki and the comfort of my room at the Brown Palace- using only a 20mm prime lens-ideal for street photography.

Do you find it easiest to shoot images when you first set eyes on a place, while the surrounding environment is still visually arousing all of your senses? A frame by frame visual exploration-documenting with every click of the shutter, unsure whether any of it will ever appear quite the same again.

Painting With Light.

Photograph © Jeremy Wade Shockley 2009.

A number of years back I took a workshop with photographer Dave Black, who is a dedicated artist in the technical process of Light Painting. This is a technique that requires manipulating the scene with creative lighting sources as a long exposure is produced.

The process can be as simple as setting up a tripod and using a basic flashlight to illuminate the scene, the “scene” can be as simple as a still life on your kitchen table, or expanded to an entire landscape.

Dave’s own work is impressive and covers everything from classic western cowboy scenes to an impressive project in which he collaborated with numerous National Geographic photographers to produce varied images from Arlington Cemetery. Dave’s approach to this project kept him working through the night with assistants and a large array of portable light sources.

This image was my first, and to date, my last attempt at Light Painting. Not that I didn’t enjoy it, but rather the technique is a style in itself removed from my own journalistic direction. This photograph was produced by setting up a Nikon D80 on Bulb, during a full moon. I tripped the shutter using a remote cable and then proceeded to “paint” light onto the walls of this Anasazi Ruin before tripping off the shutter. I then used a high contrast sepia to brighten the painted areas of the scene during post production.

The possibilities of this process are almost endless, and I certainly had a great time giving it a try- so strap on your head lamp, bring out some of your heavy flashlights, and perhaps a strobe or two with warming gels, and get creative!