The Southern Ute Drum Newspaper: Interactive website debut!

Photographs Jeremy Wade Shockley/The Southern Ute Drum. All Rights Reserved.

Visit the Southern Ute Drum’s new website at SUDRUM.com

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2012: The Year in Review.

Photo Jeremy Wade Shockley/The Southern Ute Drum

2012 marked my four-year milestone as staff photographer for The Southern Ute Drum newspaper. The publication has made some significant gains in the years that I have toiled under my own deadlines and feature stories here in the newsroom.

As a team we have expanded our page count with each passing year, undergone a series of significant redesigns, and are now printing in full color!

The Southern Ute Drum has garnered numerous journalism awards from The Society of Professional Journalist and The Native American Journalism Association.

Photography coverage and journalism conferences have landed me in Portland, OR, Sacramento, CA, Las Vegas, NV, and Washington DC in recent months.

In the weeks to come we will revamp our online presence with the hope of reaching an even broader audience across Indian Country, while polishing each aspect of our print publication to meet the challenges of the digital age.

The importance communication through media between Sovereign Nations and the United States of America has perhaps never been more relevant then it is now, as Native peoples continue to uphold cultural, and political values in the 21st century.

Please take a moment to visit our final issue of 2012 and the highlights of the year online! Click HERE.

Good light goes a long way…

Jeremy Wade Shockley/The Southern Ute Drum
This coming Saturday I will be traveling down to New Mexico to photograph heritage dancers, which brought me back to this image made a few years ago.

I can still remember this day clearly, stormy weather on the horizon, sun setting to the west, and plenty of time to work with my subjects before the performance was fully underway…for a few brief moments I was the only camera around. Resulting in a few of my favorite images, a couple of which have stood the test of time quite well. 

 I have no idea how the conditions will play out this weekend, but I am prepared for some bright, full on midday sunshine…of the New Mexico variety. Scorching hot.

Years ago, when I made photos for myself, it was the best light that I always sought out. This ideal circumstance is not a reality in the world of editorial photography, as most know.

Events are scheduled, deadlines have to be met, and above all time is usually always tight–either yours or your subjects. Luck and foresight are always at play…revisiting subjects (if possible) will always up the odds.

Making the best possible images regardless of light is the norm…and once in a while the warm light of late day, or early morning rays bath your subjects in a wonderful hue…stormy skies are a plus in my book.

Nice even light, dramatic backdrop.

Stay tuned…

Drum brings home 13 SPJ awards.

Jeremy Wade Shockley/The Southern Ute Drum
Staff Report
The Southern Ute Drum
The Southern Ute Drum made its best showing ever in a journalism contest in April, winning 13 awards — including five first-place prizes — in the Society of Professional Journalists’ annual Top of the Rockies.
Top of the Rockies is the largest regional journalism competition west of the Mississippi, open to all newspaper, radio and TV outlets in four states: Colorado, Utah, Wyoming and New Mexico.
Last year the Drum won five Top of the Rockies awards: a first place, a second place, and three thirds. This year, the staff nearly tripled its take. Editor Ace Stryker traveled to the Denver Press Club on Friday, April 13 to accept the awards.

Composition   Technician Robert L. Ortiz won a first-place award for news photography for his coverage of the opening of the Southern Ute Cultural Center & Museum, and a second-place award for feature photography.
Photographer/reporter Jeremy Wade Shockley won two first- place awards: one for feature photography for his coverage of the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad’s annual Southern Ute Heritage Train, and one for sports photography for his coverage of last summer’s Rocky Mountain State Games in Colorado Springs. He also won second and third place in news photography, third place in feature photography, and second place in single-story news reporting for his article on last year’s National Congress of American Indians annual convention.
Jeremy Wade Shockley/The Southern Ute Drum
Between Ortiz and Shockley, the Drum swept the news and feature photography categories, which include all newspapers with circulation under 10,000 in the four-state area.
Stryker won five awards, including a single-handed sweep of politics general reporting with first, second and third places. Stryker also earned first place for public service for his ongoing coverage of Southern Ute elections, and third place in education general reporting.
The staff has also submitted entries for the annual Native American Journalists Association competition, the winners of which will be announced later this summer.

The latest round of journalism awards brings the Drum’s all- time total to 41, including 26 in the past three years alone.

Jeremy Wade Shockley/The Southern Ute Drum

The Society of Professional Journalists: Rocky Mountain Region Media Awards.

Photograph Jeremy Wade Shockley/The Southern Ute Drum

SPJ Awards…

I am pleased to announce that the Southern Ute Drum newspaper pulled in five awards last week at the Society of Professional Journalists’ annual awards banquet in Denver, Colorado. Please take a moment to read the full story on page 20 of The Southern Ute Drum.

Among those awards, I garnered one for this photograph of trout being stocked into the local reservoir, and another for continued coverage of Fort Lewis College and the expansion of its long standing Native American center.

Each of our staff members earned accolades in this years media contest, spanning four states …see article for full details!

Jeremy Wade Shockley
First Place: Education General Reporting
“FLC Student Union Makes Room For New Native Center”

Jeremy Wade Shockley
Third Place: News Photography
“Lake Capote Opens With A Splash”

Here’s to the spirit of journalism! Cheers, Jeremy

Subtle Elements.

Photo Jeremy Wade Shockley/SU DRUM

I posted two very similar images which I shot a few days ago. In this I thought it would be a great time to open up the conversation on editing. Most often we take a series of images where each photograph tells its own story, especially early on. I think that as one develops their own style, they become aware of elements and composition on a level that goes beyond the average photograph. As a photographer, I find myself lining up the elements, and often the layers, shooting similar pictures in an effort to bring the concert together, or simply all the elements. They must work together visually, while also adding interest to the situation, and if done right the photograph will also capture the moment as the artist/photographer intended it to be.

This is certainly not the most complex photo, but simple and beautiful for its own reasons. Each of the two images speaks differently against an almost unchanging background- which is the point of this post. While I love the lighting and emotion of the painters profile, there is also some attraction to the brush working canvas in the second shot-no personification needed.

Photo Jeremy Wade Shockley/SU DRUM

As photographers and journalist, we will always be editing our own work, even before we click the shutter. Most often we will be editing a number of similar images post capture, making decisions that will be final. It is in my opinion the pictures that are closest to each other, that will present the hardest edit. Photographs that are arguably beautiful, and even timeless, but subtly different. You of course must make the decision. One will be published, while the others fade into the archive, perhaps resurfacing in years to come.

Please lend your opinion here, is one of these two images clearly more meaningful, or attractive than the other? If so why?

Best, Jeremy